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January 23, 2005
Are Your Goals on Track for 2005? Take This Quiz and Find Out
by Scott Love,

If you haven't thought about your goals for next year, you are already behind your best competitor. You don't have to be the best recruiter in the world. Just be better than your competitors. And if your competitors get an edge over you, no matter how slight, it's still an edge and that's all it takes to lose business. But if you can get the edge over the other guy, then you're one step ahead. And most races are won by just one step.

So here's a simple model of goal setting that you can use right away to get started and get excited about next year's success.

But first, let's take a quick quiz to see what sort of goals you should set for 2005. Remember that an unbalanced life is warped and not operating at its peak performance state. Peak performance is optimal in a relaxed and stress-free environment according to sports psychologists. It's the same way in our business. Your goals should do three things: (1) they should give clarity to what you intend to accomplish, (2) they should give focus to where you spend your time in accomplishing those things, and (3) they should give you peace and balance. By being balanced, you are fresh everyday and you have the energy and mental clarity to hustle on the phone like a maniac when it's prime time. When it's not prime time, you shouldn't work the business. Instead, work on your family and other interests. If you still don't believe me then think back to the first day you returned to the office after your last vacation. That's when you produce the most, when you've stepped back and are refreshed. Balance helps us manage the anxiety and stress associated with our wacky business.

So here's the quiz. On a scale of 1 - 10, with ten being the most optimum, how would you rank your satisfaction level in each area of your life?

  1. Personal Finances
  2. Business/Desk/Career Achievement
  3. Family
  4. Mental Development
  5. Physical Fitness
  6. Recreation
Using this model, circle each number that you came up with:
  1. Personal Finances

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  2. Business/Desk/Career Achievement

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  3. Family

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  4. Mental Development

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  5. Physical Fitness

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  6. Recreation

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Now, connect the circles from the first goal to the second goal and so on. What sort of line does it make? Is it zig-zagged? Then your life is out of balance. Is it straight? Then your life is balanced. The straighter the line, the more balanced your life is. This exercise will give you clarity on what sort of personal strategic goals you need to set for next year. Remember, anything that gets measured generally improves over time, and this is an easy way to ‘check-in' and get a quantifiable representation of how you are living your life.

Under each category, ask yourself this question: "If I reached any goal that I could set for this year, and one that I have a realistic shot at achieving, what would that goal be?" We've all heard the four trite but important basics of goal-setting from every motivational speaker on the circuit. They must be realistic, challenging, measurable, and have a deadline associated with them.

Here are a few ideas:

For personal finances, write down what percentage of your income or actual dollar amount you are going to invest in your portfolio. Also write down what percentage of your income you are going to donate to charity or tithe to your parish, church or synagogue. How much debt are you going to pay off? If you've always thought that people who set up budgets are losers, then start reading financial management books by Suze Orman or Dave Ramsey. It's about time we started taking that seriously, right? Set some goals in how you manage your finances for 2005.

For business or career achievement, write down what billing number you are going to hit or your company margins or other business goals that are on the horizon. Also, what training events or conferences are you going to attend? What is your commitment to reading sales books going to be this year?

For family, you can write down how many dates you want a month with your spouse or maybe that you only want to give kind words to your family or consistently dole out at least five hugs per day per family member.

For mental development, what sort of courses have you always wanted to take at the community college but never took the time to register? What sort of biographies do you want to read this year? How about setting a goal to read two of the classics this year?

For physical fitness, how many times per week do you intend to work out? Or maybe it's as simple as starting to work out. If you've never exercised before, perhaps you could set one goal: get a tour of your local gym. Once you go there, it'll be easier to go back. Take the pressure off yourself and make it an easy goal first, then go from there. (This is the only body that you get in this lifetime to start taking care of it.) If you've been on an exercise program, what is something new you could learn that could challenge you?

For recreation, what are some fun things you've always wanted to do but haven't? Do them in 2005. Why not take that trip to Paris that you wanted to take? You can even link some of your performance goals and recreation goals together as a sort of incentivized mechanism.

Copyright © 2004 Scott Love


  About the Author
Scott Love, of
Scott Love helps ordinary recruiters achieve extraordinary billings. To have Scott help your staff set production records in 2005, call him today at 480-650-0230 or email at scott@scottlove.com to schedule in-house training.

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